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Meaning books

A few years ago I got interested in “knowledge representation” (which might more accurately but less catchily be called “information expression”) and this got me interested in the mechanics of semantics. I thought I knew pretty well how names, expressions, and statements got their meaning in programming languages and mathematical formalisms, but didn’t understand so well how meaning works in open-ended systems such as scientific discourse and the Internet, so did a bit of research. Below are some books that I thought interesting enough to buy. (I looked at lots of articles, too, see my Pinboard page.)

If I were to wait until I had something to say about all these books, that would be forever, so I’m just offering an unannotated list, in the spirit of Phil Agre’s somewhat longer list.

Jon Barwise and Jerry Seligman.
Information Flow: The Logic of Distributed Systems.
Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Philippe Besnard and Anthony Hunter.
Elements of Argumentation.
MIT Press, 2008.

David Boersma.
Pragmatism and Reference.
MIT Press, 2009.

Radu J. Bogdan.
Predicative Minds: The Social Ontogeny of Propositional Thinking.
MIT Press, 2009.

Bob Carpenter.
Type-logical Semantics.
MIT Press, 1997.

Martha I. Gibson.
From Naming to Saying: The Unity of the Proposition.
Wiley, 2004.

Paul Horwich.
Truth, Meaning, Reality.
Oxford University Press, 2010.

Jeffrey C. King.
The Nature and Structure of Content.
Oxford University Press, 2007.

Saul Kripke.
Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language.
Harvard University Press, 1982.

Willard V. Quine.
Theories and Things.
Harvard University Press, 1981.

Scott Soames.
Philosophy of Language.
Princeton University Press, 2010.

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. 2013-01-18 at 22:37

    Oops, omitted Kripke “On Rules and Private Language”, will add it

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